Vin Decode diagram

WHAT IS A VIN?

“VIN” is an acronym for Vehicle Identification Number. This comes on every vehicle post 1954, where as prior they were identified only by chassis code. As put in the diagram above found on Carfax.com, the first three digits identify the Manufacturer number. 1HG belongs to Honda, for instance. The next set of numbers and letters belong to the vehicle description. In this example, this belongs to a Honda Accord. The check digit comes shortly after, which is used to verify the VIN with the model year, then the plant that it was created at defined by a letter, then the part that scares everyone: The last six digits. These digits are what make your car, your car. To decode this example, the VIN reads:

“This vehicle is a 2003 Honda Accord EX, 2 door sedan (hard top coupe), Automatic transmission assembled in Marysville, Ohio, ID# 004352”

WHY WOULD SOMEONE WANT MY VIN?

Generally speaking, nobody wants your VIN. VIN cloning, or swapping, is a very expensive, and highly illegal process. However, in a few niche cases, such as replicating an iconic vehicle like Dom’s charger in the Fast & The Furious, some people might fork out five figures to have some black market VIN tags printed, and applied to their clone car. This is part of why movie studios like Universal keep vehicle VINs hidden, and unreleased to the public.

The second reason someone may want your VIN is to swap it. Why would someone swap the VIN on their vehicle? Well, if the police have pulled your car over, and deemed it unsafe for roadway use, you might consider it. (Pipetale does NOT condone this action in any way, shape or form) Let’s create an example: Mike has a 1991 Mustang GT that has an aftermarket exhaust on it, is lowered, and wakes all of his neighbors up going to cars and coffee every Thursday. One day, an officer catches Mike, and gives him a mandatory VI (Vehicle Inspection) slip. Now, Mikes VIN is flagged, and he needs to take it to a shop that can fully inspect the vehicle, and pass it for road safety. However, these inspections are expensive, and if the tiniest thing is wrong on the car, it doesn’t pass.

So, Mike buys another 1991 Mustang with the same features, and takes the VIN tags out of the windshield, and door panels to put onto his currently built one! Voila! Nobody is any the wiser! Unless Officer Dan pulls Mike over again, then it’s jail time.

Fake VIN tag
An incredibly cheap, knock off VIN tag we found on Amazon.. Just… Wow.

BUT WAIT, ADAM…

I know what you’re thinking. Where does YOUR VIN come into play? Well, it doesn’t! If the person is pulled over, they still need to provide valid registration and paperwork. If someone were to find your VIN on Pipetale, and pay the absurd amount of time, and money to find someone to clone your VIN, they still have to get the paperwork. Then, what if your car is in New York, and they live in California? Well, then they still need to get your VIN to pass a safety inspection in California to have it be road safe. At this point, what is the point?

A QUICK RECAP

All in all, your information stored on Pipetale is for documentation purposes only, and to assist you in either selling your car, or getting a fair value during the insurance process in a case of total loss. Pipetale can document shop reports, build logs, and stories alike. I know if some adjuster claimed that my 1987 Surpa was “Just a $2,000 car” (To which I was told @ Insurance) I would be incredibly heartbroken. Not only is my pride and joy gone, but I’ve been shafted on the value, too.

We hope you get an incredible value out of Pipetale, as that was the intent and purpose of the site! If you have any other questions, please feel free to email me at [email protected]!

Vin Decode diagram

WHAT IS A VIN?

“VIN” is an acronym for Vehicle Identification Number. This comes on every vehicle post 1954, where as prior they were identified only by chassis code. As put in the diagram above found on Carfax.com, the first three digits identify the Manufacturer number. 1HG belongs to Honda, for instance. The next set of numbers and letters belong to the vehicle description. In this example, this belongs to a Honda Accord. The check digit comes shortly after, which is used to verify the VIN with the model year, then the plant that it was created at defined by a letter, then the part that scares everyone: The last six digits. These digits are what make your car, your car. To decode this example, the VIN reads:

“This vehicle is a 2003 Honda Accord EX, 2 door sedan (hard top coupe), Automatic transmission assembled in Marysville, Ohio, ID# 004352”

WHY WOULD SOMEONE WANT MY VIN?

Generally speaking, nobody wants your VIN. VIN cloning, or swapping, is a very expensive, and highly illegal process. However, in a few niche cases, such as replicating an iconic vehicle like Dom’s charger in the Fast & The Furious, some people might fork out five figures to have some black market VIN tags printed, and applied to their clone car. This is part of why movie studios like Universal keep vehicle VINs hidden, and unreleased to the public.

The second reason someone may want your VIN is to swap it. Why would someone swap the VIN on their vehicle? Well, if the police have pulled your car over, and deemed it unsafe for roadway use, you might consider it. (Pipetale does NOT condone this action in any way, shape or form) Let’s create an example: Mike has a 1991 Mustang GT that has an aftermarket exhaust on it, is lowered, and wakes all of his neighbors up going to cars and coffee every Thursday. One day, an officer catches Mike, and gives him a mandatory VI (Vehicle Inspection) slip. Now, Mikes VIN is flagged, and he needs to take it to a shop that can fully inspect the vehicle, and pass it for road safety. However, these inspections are expensive, and if the tiniest thing is wrong on the car, it doesn’t pass.

So, Mike buys another 1991 Mustang with the same features, and takes the VIN tags out of the windshield, and door panels to put onto his currently built one! Voila! Nobody is any the wiser! Unless Officer Dan pulls Mike over again, then it’s jail time.

Fake VIN tag
An incredibly cheap, knock off VIN tag we found on Amazon.. Just… Wow.

BUT WAIT, ADAM…

I know what you’re thinking. Where does YOUR VIN come into play? Well, it doesn’t! If the person is pulled over, they still need to provide valid registration and paperwork. If someone were to find your VIN on Pipetale, and pay the absurd amount of time, and money to find someone to clone your VIN, they still have to get the paperwork. Then, what if your car is in New York, and they live in California? Well, then they still need to get your VIN to pass a safety inspection in California to have it be road safe. At this point, what is the point?

A QUICK RECAP

All in all, your information stored on Pipetale is for documentation purposes only, and to assist you in either selling your car, or getting a fair value during the insurance process in a case of total loss. Pipetale can document shop reports, build logs, and stories alike. I know if some adjuster claimed that my 1987 Surpa was “Just a $2,000 car” (To which I was told @ Insurance) I would be incredibly heartbroken. Not only is my pride and joy gone, but I’ve been shafted on the value, too.

We hope you get an incredible value out of Pipetale, as that was the intent and purpose of the site! If you have any other questions, please feel free to email me at [email protected]!

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